The Male Body at War

The Male Body at War Author Christina S. Jarvis
ISBN-10 0875803229
Year 2004
Pages 243
Language en
Publisher
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Fearless, youthful, athletic - the soldier embodies masculine ideals and, since World War II when the nation came of age as a world superpower, has represented the manhood of the United States. This title examines the creation of this national symbol, from military recruitment posters, to Hollywood war films, to the iconic flag-raisers at Iwo Jima.

Black Yanks in the Pacific

Black Yanks in the Pacific Author Michael Cullen Green
ISBN-10 0801448964
Year 2010
Pages 207
Language en
Publisher Cornell University Press
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By the end of World War II, many black citizens viewed service in the segregated American armed forces with distaste if not disgust. Meanwhile, domestic racism and Jim Crow, ongoing Asian struggles against European colonialism, and prewar calls for Afro-Asian solidarity had generated considerable black ambivalence toward American military expansion in the Pacific, in particular the impending occupation of Japan. However, over the following decade black military service enabled tens of thousands of African Americans to interact daily with Asian peoples--encounters on a scale impossible prior to 1945. It also encouraged African Americans to share many of the same racialized attitudes toward Asian peoples held by their white counterparts and to identify with their government's foreign policy objectives in Asia. In Black Yanks in the Pacific, Michael Cullen Green tells the story of African American engagement with military service in occupied Japan, war-torn South Korea, and an emerging empire of bases anchored in those two nations. After World War II, African Americans largely embraced the socioeconomic opportunities afforded by service overseas--despite the maintenance of military segregation into the early 1950s--while strained Afro-Asian social relations in Japan and South Korea encouraged a sense of insurmountable difference from Asian peoples. By the time the Supreme Court declared de jure segregation unconstitutional in its landmark 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision, African American investment in overseas military expansion was largely secured. Although they were still subject to discrimination at home, many African Americans had come to distrust East Asian peoples and to accept the legitimacy of an expanding military empire abroad.

Dismembering the Male

Dismembering the Male Author Joanna Bourke
ISBN-10 UVA:X006018416
Year 1999
Pages 336
Language en
Publisher
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Impact on the male body of the War to end all wars. Issues such as malingering, dismemberment and male bonding.

What Soldiers Do

What Soldiers Do Author Mary Louise Roberts
ISBN-10 9780226923093
Year 2013-05-17
Pages 352
Language en
Publisher University of Chicago Press
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How do you convince men to charge across heavily mined beaches into deadly machine-gun fire? Do you appeal to their bonds with their fellow soldiers, their patriotism, their desire to end tyranny and mass murder? Certainly—but if you’re the US Army in 1944, you also try another tack: you dangle the lure of beautiful French women, waiting just on the other side of the wire, ready to reward their liberators in oh so many ways. That’s not the picture of the Greatest Generation that we’ve been given, but it’s the one Mary Louise Roberts paints to devastating effect in What Soldiers Do. Drawing on an incredible range of sources, including news reports, propaganda and training materials, official planning documents, wartime diaries, and memoirs, Roberts tells the fascinating and troubling story of how the US military command systematically spread—and then exploited—the myth of French women as sexually experienced and available. The resulting chaos—ranging from flagrant public sex with prostitutes to outright rape and rampant venereal disease—horrified the war-weary and demoralized French population. The sexual predation, and the blithe response of the American military leadership, also caused serious friction between the two nations just as they were attempting to settle questions of long-term control over the liberated territories and the restoration of French sovereignty. While never denying the achievement of D-Day, or the bravery of the soldiers who took part, What Soldiers Do reminds us that history is always more useful—and more interesting—when it is most honest, and when it goes beyond the burnished beauty of nostalgia to grapple with the real lives and real mistakes of the people who lived it.

Retiring Men

Retiring Men Author Gregory Wood
ISBN-10 9780761856801
Year 2012-01-18
Pages 274
Language en
Publisher University Press of America
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As life spans expanded dramatically in the United States after 1900, and employers increasingly demanded the speed and stamina of youth in the workplace, men struggled to sustain identities as workers, breadwinners, and patriarchs—the core ideals of twentieth-century masculinity. Longer life threatened manhood as men confronted age discrimination at work, mandatory retirement, and fixed incomes as recipients of Social Security and workplace pensions. They struggled to somehow sustain manliness in retirement, a new phase of life supposedly defined by the absence of labor. Ironically, retiring men pursued ways to stay “productive”: retirees created new daily routines of golf and shuffleboard games, tinkered with tools in garages, attended social club meetings, armed themselves for hunting and fishing excursions, and threw themselves into yard work. Others looked for new jobs or business ventures. Only unending activity could help to ensure that the “golden years” would be good years for older men of the twentieth century.

The Media and the Models of Masculinity

The Media and the Models of Masculinity Author Mark Moss
ISBN-10 9780739166260
Year 2012-07-10
Pages 222
Language en
Publisher Lexington Books
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Employing the most recent works in the a variety of different disciplines, Mark Moss's The Media and the Models of Masculinity makes the current discourse(s) on masculinity accessible to students in media studies, men's studies, and history. By engaging in critical discussions on everything from fashion, to domestic space, to sports and television, readers will be privy to a modern and fascinating account of the diverse and dominant perceptions of and on masculine culture.

Armed Forces

Armed Forces Author Robert Eberwein
ISBN-10 9780813541501
Year 2007-06-13
Pages 216
Language en
Publisher Rutgers University Press
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In war films, the portrayal of deep friendships between men is commonplace. Given the sexually anxious nature of the American imagination, such bonds are often interpreted as carrying a homoerotic subtext. In Armed Forces , Robert Eberwein argues that an expanded conception of masculinity and sexuality is necessary in order to understand more fully the intricacy of these intense and emotional human relationships. Drawing on a range of examples from silent films such as What Price Glory and Wings to sound era works like The Deer Hunter, Platoon, Three Kings, and Pearl Harbor , he shows how close readings of war films, particularly in relation to their cultural contexts, demonstrate that depictions of heterosexual love, including those in romantic triangles, actually help to define and clarify the nonsexual nature of male love. The book also explores the problematic aspects of masculinity and sexuality when threatened by wounds, as in The Best Years of Our Lives, and considers the complex and persistent analogy between weapons and the male body, as in Full Metal Jacket and Saving Private Ryan .

Meet Joe Copper

Meet Joe Copper Author Matthew L. Basso
ISBN-10 9780226038865
Year 2013-07-17
Pages 360
Language en
Publisher University of Chicago Press
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“I realize that I am a soldier of production whose duties are as important in this war as those of the man behind the gun.” So began the pledge that many home front men took at the outset of World War II when they went to work in the factories, fields, and mines while their compatriots fought in the battlefields of Europe and on the bloody beaches of the Pacific. The male experience of working and living in wartime America is rarely examined, but the story of men like these provides a crucial counter-narrative to the national story of Rosie the Riveter and GI Joe that dominates scholarly and popular discussions of World War II. In Meet Joe Copper, Matthew L. Basso describes the formation of a powerful, white, working-class masculine ideology in the decades prior to the war, and shows how it thrived—on the job, in the community, and through union politics. Basso recalls for us the practices and beliefs of the first- and second-generation immigrant copper workers of Montana while advancing the historical conversation on gender, class, and the formation of a white ethnic racial identity. Meet Joe Copper provides a context for our ideas of postwar masculinity and whiteness and finally returns the men of the home front to our reckoning of the Greatest Generation and the New Deal era.

Playboy and the Making of the Good Life in Modern America

Playboy and the Making of the Good Life in Modern America Author Elizabeth Fraterrigo
ISBN-10 019973948X
Year 2009-11-05
Pages 308
Language en
Publisher Oxford University Press
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Playboy was more than a magazine filled with pictures of nude women and advice on how to mix the perfect martini. Indeed, the magazine's vision of sexual liberation, high living, and "the good life" came to define mainstream images of postwar life. In exploring the history of America's most widely read and influential men's magazine, Elizabeth Fraterrigo hones in on the values, style, and gender formulations put forth in its pages and how they gained widespread currency in American culture. She shows that for Hugh Hefner, the "good life" meant the freedom to choose a lifestyle, and the one he promoted was the "playboy life," in which expensive goods and sexually available women were plentiful, obligations were few, and if one worked hard enough, one could enjoy abundant leisure and consumption. In support of this view, Playboy attacked early marriage, traditional gender arrangements, and sanctions against premarital sex, challenging the conservatism of family-centered postwar society. And despite the magazine's ups and downs, significant features of this "playboy life" have become engrained in American society.

Officer Nurse Woman

Officer  Nurse  Woman Author Kara Dixon Vuic
ISBN-10 9780801893919
Year 2010
Pages 271
Language en
Publisher JHU Press
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Drawing on more than 100 interviews, Vuic allows the nurses to tell their own captivating stories, from their reasons for joining the military to the physical and emotional demands of a horrific war and postwar debates about how to commemorate their service. Vuic also explores the gender issues that arose when a male-dominated army actively recruited and employed the services of 5,000 women nurses in the midst of a growing feminist movement and a changing nursing profession. Women drawn to the army's patriotic promise faced disturbing realities in the virtually all-male hospitals of South Vietnam. Men who joined the nurse corps ran headlong into the army's belief that women should nurse and men should fight.

Let Us Fight as Free Men

Let Us Fight as Free Men Author Christine Knauer
ISBN-10 9780812209594
Year 2014-03-07
Pages 352
Language en
Publisher University of Pennsylvania Press
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Today, the military is one the most racially diverse institutions in the United States. But for many decades African American soldiers battled racial discrimination and segregation within its ranks. In the years after World War II, the integration of the armed forces was a touchstone in the homefront struggle for equality—though its importance is often overlooked in contemporary histories of the civil rights movement. Drawing on a wide array of sources, from press reports and newspapers to organizational and presidential archives, historian Christine Knauer recounts the conflicts surrounding black military service and the fight for integration. Let Us Fight as Free Men shows that, even after their service to the nation in World War II, it took the persistent efforts of black soldiers, as well as civilian activists and government policy changes, to integrate the military. In response to unjust treatment during and immediately after the war, African Americans pushed for integration on the strength of their service despite the oppressive limitations they faced on the front and at home. Pressured by civil rights activists such as A. Philip Randolph, President Harry S. Truman passed an executive order that called for equal treatment in the military. Even so, integration took place haltingly and was realized only after the political and strategic realities of the Korean War forced the Army to allow black soldiers to fight alongside their white comrades. While the war pushed the civil rights struggle beyond national boundaries, it also revealed the persistence of racial discrimination and exposed the limits of interracial solidarity. Let Us Fight as Free Men reveals the heated debates about the meaning of military service, manhood, and civil rights strategies within the African American community and the United States as a whole.

Encyclopedia of War and American Society

Encyclopedia of War and American Society Author Peter Karsten
ISBN-10 9780761930976
Year 2005-11-18
Pages 1392
Language en
Publisher SAGE
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This Encyclopedia, in three volumes, cover a wide range of general thematic categories, issues and topics that address not only the geopolitical effects of war, but also show how the United States engagement in national and international conflicts has affected the social and cultural arena.

Slinging Doughnuts for the Boys

Slinging Doughnuts for the Boys Author James H. Madison
ISBN-10 9780253350473
Year 2007
Pages 300
Language en
Publisher Indiana University Press
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Elizabeth Richardson was a Red Cross volunteer who worked as a Clubmobile hostess during World War II until her death in a plane crash in July 1945. Her job was to provide free doughnuts and coffee, cigarettes and gum to American soldiers on duty in England, and later in France. More importantly, she and her colleagues provided a slice of home. They were American girls with whom soldiers could talk, flirt, dance, and perhaps find companionship. For the most part, the job was not hazardous--except when V-1 rockets rained down on London--but it required physical endurance as well as the honed skills of a counselor. Liz Richardson was a witty writer and astute observer. Her letters and diaries reveal an intelligent, independent, and personable woman. In his commentary, James H. Madison provides information about her life, the activities of the Red Cross Clubmobiles, and the war. This book is an exceptional window into a past that is all too quickly fading from memory.

Personal Perspectives

Personal Perspectives Author Timothy C. Dowling
ISBN-10 9781851095759
Year 2005
Pages 351
Language en
Publisher ABC-CLIO
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A compelling account of the personal experiences of groups who were affected by World War II, both on and off the battlefields. * Twelve essays written by international scholars and authors describe what it was like to be members of different groups during World War II * Each essay contains a brief historical introduction that provides context focusing on individuals and their experiences in war and combat * A bibliography accompanies each essay and a general bibliography emphasizes works in social history, listing additional readings for those who wish to pursue the topics further * Includes a detailed index and timeline for easy access to specific information