All the Real Indians Died Off

 All the Real Indians Died Off Author Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz
ISBN-10 9780807062661
Year 2016-10-04
Pages 224
Language en
Publisher Beacon Press
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Unpacks the twenty-one most common myths and misconceptions about Native Americans In this enlightening book, scholars and activists Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz and Dina Gilio-Whitaker tackle a wide range of myths about Native American culture and history that have misinformed generations. Tracing how these ideas evolved, and drawing from history, the authors disrupt long-held and enduring myths such as: “Columbus Discovered America” “Thanksgiving Proves the Indians Welcomed Pilgrims” “Indians Were Savage and Warlike” “Europeans Brought Civilization to Backward Indians” “The United States Did Not Have a Policy of Genocide” “Sports Mascots Honor Native Americans” “Most Indians Are on Government Welfare” “Indian Casinos Make Them All Rich” “Indians Are Naturally Predisposed to Alcohol” Each chapter deftly shows how these myths are rooted in the fears and prejudice of European settlers and in the larger political agendas of a settler state aimed at acquiring Indigenous land and tied to narratives of erasure and disappearance. Accessibly written and revelatory, “All the Real Indians Died Off” challenges readers to rethink what they have been taught about Native Americans and history. From the Trade Paperback edition.

All the Real Indians Died Off

All the Real Indians Died Off Author Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz
ISBN-10 9780807062654
Year 2016-10-04
Pages 224
Language en
Publisher Beacon Press
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Unpacks the twenty-one most common myths and misconceptions about Native Americans "All the Real Indians Died Off" and 20 Other Myths About Native Americans critically deconstructs persistent myths about American Indians that have taken hold in the United States. Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz and Dina Gilio-Whitaker tackle a wide range of myths about Native American culture ("Indians Are Naturally Predisposed to Alcoholism") and history ("Columbus Discovered America") and trace how they developed. They deftly show how these myths are rooted in the fears and prejudice of European settlers and in the larger political agendas of the settler state aimed at acquiring Indigenous land, and that they can be traced to narratives of erasure and disappearance.

An Indigenous Peoples History of the United States

An Indigenous Peoples  History of the United States Author Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz
ISBN-10 0807057835
Year 2015-08-11
Pages 312
Language en
Publisher Beacon Press (MA)
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The first history of the United States told from the perspective of indigenous peoples Today in the United States, there are more than five hundred federally recognized Indigenous nations comprising nearly three million people, descendants of the fifteen million Native people who once inhabited this land. The centuries-long genocidal program of the US settler-colonial regimen has largely been omitted from history. Now, for the first time, acclaimed historian and activist Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz offers a history of the United States told from the perspective of Indigenous peoples and reveals how Native Americans, for centuries, actively resisted expansion of the US empire. In An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States, Dunbar-Ortiz adroitly challenges the founding myth of the United States and shows how policy against the Indigenous peoples was colonialist and designed to seize the territories of the original inhabitants, displacing or eliminating them. And as Dunbar-Ortiz reveals, this policy was praised in popular culture, through writers like James Fenimore Cooper and Walt Whitman, and in the highest offices of government and the military. Shockingly, as the genocidal policy reached its zenith under President Andrew Jackson, its ruthlessness was best articulated by US Army general Thomas S. Jesup, who, in 1836, wrote of the Seminoles: "The country can be rid of them only by exterminating them." Spanning more than four hundred years, this classic bottom-up peoples' history radically reframes US history and explodes the silences that have haunted our national narrative.

The Mismeasure of Desire

The Mismeasure of Desire Author David E. Stannard
ISBN-10 0199838984
Year 1993-11-18
Pages 416
Language en
Publisher Oxford University Press
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For four hundred years--from the first Spanish assaults against the Arawak people of Hispaniola in the 1490s to the U.S. Army's massacre of Sioux Indians at Wounded Knee in the 1890s--the indigenous inhabitants of North and South America endured an unending firestorm of violence. During that time the native population of the Western Hemisphere declined by as many as 100 million people. Indeed, as historian David E. Stannard argues in this stunning new book, the European and white American destruction of the native peoples of the Americas was the most massive act of genocide in the history of the world. Stannard begins with a portrait of the enormous richness and diversity of life in the Americas prior to Columbus's fateful voyage in 1492. He then follows the path of genocide from the Indies to Mexico and Central and South America, then north to Florida, Virginia, and New England, and finally out across the Great Plains and Southwest to California and the North Pacific Coast. Stannard reveals that wherever Europeans or white Americans went, the native people were caught between imported plagues and barbarous atrocities, typically resulting in the annihilation of 95 percent of their populations. What kind of people, he asks, do such horrendous things to others? His highly provocative answer: Christians. Digging deeply into ancient European and Christian attitudes toward sex, race, and war, he finds the cultural ground well prepared by the end of the Middle Ages for the centuries-long genocide campaign that Europeans and their descendants launched--and in places continue to wage--against the New World's original inhabitants. Advancing a thesis that is sure to create much controversy, Stannard contends that the perpetrators of the American Holocaust drew on the same ideological wellspring as did the later architects of the Nazi Holocaust. It is an ideology that remains dangerously alive today, he adds, and one that in recent years has surfaced in American justifications for large-scale military intervention in Southeast Asia and the Middle East. At once sweeping in scope and meticulously detailed, American Holocaust is a work of impassioned scholarship that is certain to ignite intense historical and moral debate.

Contemporary Native American Cultural Issues

Contemporary Native American Cultural Issues Author Duane Champagne
ISBN-10 0761990593
Year 1999-01-01
Pages 326
Language en
Publisher Rowman Altamira
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Essays discuss Native American identity, gender, the cultural significance of the powwow, film and other media, health matters, environmental concerns, and other questions

The Other Slavery

The Other Slavery Author Andrés Reséndez
ISBN-10 9780544602670
Year 2016-04-12
Pages 448
Language en
Publisher Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
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A landmark history — the sweeping story of the enslavement of tens of thousands of Indians across America, from the time of the conquistadors up to the early 20th century Since the time of Columbus, Indian slavery was illegal in much of the American continent. Yet, as Andrés Reséndez illuminates in his myth-shattering The Other Slavery, it was practiced for centuries as an open secret. There was no abolitionist movement to protect the tens of thousands of natives who were kidnapped and enslaved by the conquistadors, then forced to descend into the “mouth of hell” of eighteenth-century silver mines or, later, made to serve as domestics for Mormon settlers and rich Anglos. Reséndez builds the incisive case that it was mass slavery, more than epidemics, that decimated Indian populations across North America. New evidence, including testimonies of courageous priests, rapacious merchants, Indian captives, and Anglo colonists, sheds light too on Indian enslavement of other Indians — as what started as a European business passed into the hands of indigenous operators and spread like wildfire across vast tracts of the American Southwest. The Other Slavery reveals nothing less than a key missing piece of American history. For over two centuries we have fought over, abolished, and tried to come to grips with African-American slavery. It is time for the West to confront an entirely separate, equally devastating enslavement we have long failed truly to see.

Red Dirt

Red Dirt Author Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz
ISBN-10 1859848567
Year 1997
Pages 224
Language en
Publisher Verso
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The author describes her childhood in rural Oklahoma, from the Dust Bowl days to the end of the Eisenhower era

The Thanksgiving Story

The Thanksgiving Story Author Alice Dalgliesh
ISBN-10 9781442465527
Year 2012-09-04
Pages 32
Language en
Publisher Simon and Schuster
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In this festive Caldecott Honor–winning picture book, Alice Dalgiesh brings to life the origin of the Thanksgiving holiday for readers of all ages. Giles, Constance and Damaris Hopkins are all passengers aboard the crowded Mayflower, journeying to the New World to start a new life. Things get a little more cramped when their baby brother Oceanus is born during the passage. However, when they arrive, there are even worse challenges to face as the Pilgrims are subjected to hunger, cold, and sickness that put their small colony in great danger. With the help of the Native Americans though, they might just be able to survive their first year in this strange land—and have a November harvest to celebrate for generations!

Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee

Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee Author Dee Brown
ISBN-10 9781453274149
Year 2012-10-23
Pages 494
Language en
Publisher Open Road Media
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The “fascinating” #1 New York Times bestseller that awakened the world to the destruction of American Indians in the nineteenth-century West (The Wall Street Journal). First published in 1970, Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee generated shockwaves with its frank and heartbreaking depiction of the systematic annihilation of American Indian tribes across the western frontier. In this nonfiction account, Dee Brown focuses on the betrayals, battles, and massacres suffered by American Indians between 1860 and 1890. He tells of the many tribes and their renowned chiefs—from Geronimo to Red Cloud, Sitting Bull to Crazy Horse—who struggled to combat the destruction of their people and culture. Forcefully written and meticulously researched, Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee inspired a generation to take a second look at how the West was won. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Dee Brown including rare photos from the author’s personal collection.

American Indians

American Indians Author Devon Abbott Mihesuah
ISBN-10 9780932863959
Year 2013-10-29
Pages
Language en
Publisher SCB Distributors
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American Indians: Stereotypes & Realities provides an informative and engaging Indian perspective on common misconceptions concerning American Indians which afflict public and even academic circles to this very day. Written in a highly accessible stereotype/reality format, it includes numerous illustrations and brief bibliographies on each topic PLUS these appendices: * Do's and Don'ts for those who teach American Indian history and culture * Suggested Guidelines for Institutions with Scholars who Conduct Research on American Indians * Course outline for American Indian history and culture survey with suggested projects * Outline for course "American Indian Women in History" with extensive bibliography An American Indian perspective on discrimination issues WIDELY ENDORSED BY AMERICAN INDIAN SCHOLARS "Professor Mihesuah goes beyond simply providing responses to common stereotypes. She provides the reader with assistance in efforts to improve understanding of her peoples. Each of the chapters provides solid information to challenge myths and stereotypes. Excellent photographs are interspersed throughout the book.... The implications of this book for social work practice are extensive... A valuable contribution" Journal of Multicultural Social Work "A precious primer on Native Americans for anyone who can handle the truth about how the West was won." Kam Williams, syndicated "This book should be read by every educator and included in the collections of every school and university library." Flagstaff Live "Mihesuah's work should be required reading for elemetary and upper level teachers, college instructors and parents. Let us hope it finds a wide readership in mainstream circles." Joel Monture, MultiCultural Review "Devon Mihesuah has provided precious insight into the racial identity and cultural struggles of American Indians as they strive to succeed in modern America. She has successfully challenged harmful stereotypes and racism in this significant book... If an accurate history is to be learned, then society must accept the truth of cultural pluralism and give equal and fair treatment to Native Americans and other minorities... As an American Indian and a university scholar of history, I applaud Devon Mihesuah for successfully confronting the literature of false portrayal and negative images of Indian people." Dr. Donald L. Fixico, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo

Lies My Teacher Told Me

Lies My Teacher Told Me Author James W. Loewen
ISBN-10 9781595586537
Year 2008-04-08
Pages 444
Language en
Publisher The New Press
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Since its first publication in 1995, Lies My Teacher Told Me has gone on to win an American Book Award, the Oliver Cromwell Cox Award for Distinguished Anti-Racist Scholarship, and to sell over half a million copies in its various editions. What started out as a survey of the twelve leading American history textbooks has ended up being what the San Francisco Chronicle calls “an extremely convincing plea for truth in education.” In Lies My Teacher Told Me, James W. Loewen brings history alive in all its complexity and ambiguity. Beginning with pre-Columbian history and ranging over characters and events as diverse as Reconstruction, Helen Keller, the first Thanksgiving, and the Mai Lai massacre, Loewen offers an eye-opening critique of existing textbooks, and a wonderful retelling of American history as it should—and could—be taught to American students. This 10th anniversary edition features a handsome new cover and a new introduction by the author.

Thundersticks

Thundersticks Author David J. Silverman
ISBN-10 9780674974746
Year 2016-10-10
Pages 360
Language en
Publisher Harvard University Press
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David Silverman argues against the notion that Indians prized flintlock muskets more for their pyrotechnics than for their efficiency as tools of war. Native peoples fully recognized the potential of firearms to assist them in their struggles against colonial forces, and mostly against one another, as arms races erupted across North America.

Reimagining Indian Country

Reimagining Indian Country Author Nicolas G. Rosenthal
ISBN-10 9780807869994
Year 2012-05-15
Pages 256
Language en
Publisher Univ of North Carolina Press
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For decades, most American Indians have lived in cities, not on reservations or in rural areas. Still, scholars, policymakers, and popular culture often regard Indians first as reservation peoples, living apart from non-Native Americans. In this book, Nicolas Rosenthal reorients our understanding of the experience of American Indians by tracing their migration to cities, exploring the formation of urban Indian communities, and delving into the shifting relationships between reservations and urban areas from the early twentieth century to the present. With a focus on Los Angeles, which by 1970 had more Native American inhabitants than any place outside the Navajo reservation, Reimagining Indian Country shows how cities have played a defining role in modern American Indian life and examines the evolution of Native American identity in recent decades. Rosenthal emphasizes the lived experiences of Native migrants in realms including education, labor, health, housing, and social and political activism to understand how they adapted to an urban environment, and to consider how they formed--and continue to form--new identities. Though still connected to the places where indigenous peoples have preserved their culture, Rosenthal argues that Indian identity must be understood as dynamic and fully enmeshed in modern global networks.

Blood and Land

Blood and Land Author J.C.H. King
ISBN-10 9781846148088
Year 2016-08-25
Pages 672
Language en
Publisher Penguin UK
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Blood and Land is a dazzling, panoramic account of the history and achievements of Native North Americans, and why they matter today. It is about why no understanding of the wider world is possible without comprehending the original inhabitants of the United States and Canada: Native Americans, First Nations and Arctic peoples. This highly personal book, based on years of travel and first-hand research in North America, introduces a deeply complex story, of myriad identities and determined ethnicities - from the desert Southwest to the high Arctic, from first contact between Europeans and Native Americans to the challenges of Native leadership today. Instead of writing a chronological history, King confronts the reader with the paradoxes, diversity and successes of Native North Americans. Their astonishing ingenuity and supple intelligence enabled, after centuries of suffering both violence and dispossession, a striking level of recovery, optimism and autonomy in the twenty-first century. Beautifully illustrated and filled with arresting and surprising stories, Blood and Land looks well beyond the 'feathers-and-failure' narratives beloved by historians to show us Native North America as it was and is.

An American Genocide

An American Genocide Author Benjamin Madley
ISBN-10 9780300182170
Year 2016-05-24
Pages 480
Language en
Publisher Yale University Press
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Between 1846 and 1873, California’s Indian population plunged from perhaps 150,000 to 30,000. Benjamin Madley is the first historian to uncover the full extent of the slaughter, the involvement of state and federal officials, the taxpayer dollars that supported the violence, indigenous resistance, who did the killing, and why the killings ended. This deeply researched book is a comprehensive and chilling history of an American genocide. Madley describes pre-contact California and precursors to the genocide before explaining how the Gold Rush stirred vigilante violence against California Indians. He narrates the rise of a state-sanctioned killing machine and the broad societal, judicial, and political support for genocide. Many participated: vigilantes, volunteer state militiamen, U.S. Army soldiers, U.S. congressmen, California governors, and others. The state and federal governments spent at least $1,700,000 on campaigns against California Indians. Besides evaluating government officials’ culpability, Madley considers why the slaughter constituted genocide and how other possible genocides within and beyond the Americas might be investigated using the methods presented in this groundbreaking book.